Greater Portland/Vancouver Metropolitan Area and Central Oregon

Serving the Greater Portland Metropolitan Area including:

Sandy, Estacada, Eagle Creek, Boring, Welches, Mt. Hood, Portland, Milwaukie, Oregon City, Gladstone, Gresham, Damascus, Clackamas,Troutdale,  Brightwood, and Rhododendron

Also Serving Central Oregon including:

Bend, Redmond, Sisters, Sunriver, LaPine, Prineville, Madras and North Klamath County.

Central Oregon

Central Oregon

Central Oregon Including:

Bend~Redmond~Sisters~Prineville~Sunriver

Three Rivers South~Lapine~Mt Bachelor

 

Oregons Year Round Outdoor Playground!  Snow in the Winter, and lots of Sun in the Summer. Central Oregon boasts an average of 300 days of Sun, which makes it a very popular place to enjoy all seasons. In the winter, Mt. Bachelor is only a short distance away and brings steller skiing, cross country skiing and snowshoeing. Summer brings endless areas for Hiking, Camping, Fishing , Boating and Rafting in the one of many Lakes and Rivers.

Central Oregon consists of a number of communities including Bend, Redmond, Sisters, Prineville, Sunriver and LaPine

Portland, Oregon ***ENTIRE METROPOLITAN AREA***

Portland, Oregon  ***ENTIRE METROPOLITAN AREA***


W E L C O M E T O
PO R T L A N D
O R E G O N




Big city excitement and small town charm make Portland, Oregon, known as "the City of Roses", one of the favorite destinations in the West. Portland is situated approximately 70 miles from the Pacific in a magnificent setting between the sparkling waters of the Columbia and Willamette Rivers. Portland's historic old town, galleries and museums, Saturday Market, and theatre companies will keep visitors busy for weeks! Its lush green parks are perfect for a picnic or an afternoon stroll. Also, Portland is just a short distance from Willamette valley wineries, skiing at Timberline Lodge and all of the excitement and beauty of Oregon's spectacular ocean beaches.

Portland's award winning mass transit system is one of the most extensive and advanced in the U.S. The transit system includes buses, streetcars, historic trollies and the MAX, an urban light rail line. There's also a downtown transit mall and Fareless Square, the downtown free-ride zone. It's fun to take a relaxing ride on the MAX train and watch the Portland world slide by.
Portland was built with walking in mind. The short blocks, combined with public art and old fashioned statuary, fountains, bridges and parks offer opportunities for leisure and contemplation for the casual stroller. Walking tours of the downtown area focusing on the best of the city's art, architecture, urban parks and fountains are available. For the more adventuresome walker, Forest Park has over 70 miles of trails.
Nightlife in Portland is excellent and varied. This includes the world class performances of the internationally-known Oregon Symphony. Performing arts in the area offer ballet, Shakespeare, Broadway musicals, modern dance and much more. Oregon Zoo concerts are a summer treat, with music for all kinds of listeners. See art up close at the First Thursday art gallery walks in Westside Portland or in Northeast Portland galleries during Last Thursday walks. Portland has many local pubs and brewhouses, where tasting local microbrews is considered a fine way to spend an evening. The Rose City is the home of the Trail Blazers basketball team, and also has hockey and baseball for sports fans.
A splendid location, relaxed respectability, and an urban lifestyle that is unsurpassed for its livability makes Portland a city to visit and remember.

Sandy, Oregon

Sandy, Oregon



Welcome to Sandy, Oregon

Sandy, Oregon is a city of over 8,200 population located on the Mt. Hood Highway (U.S. 26) midway between Portland and Mt. Hood.
Residents of Sandy enjoy a mild climate, clean air, good water, beautiful scenic views in a country setting, and all the advantages of small-town living while being only 45 minutes from the urban amenities of downtown Portland.
Though Sandy’s heritage was logging and saw milling, today’s economic activity comes from light-industrial manufacturing and service businesses.
Many Sandy residents commute to jobs in nearby Portland. Agricultural crops in the surrounding area are primarily nursery stock and a variety of berries.
Sandy’s civic organizations – including Kiwanis, Lions, and Optimist – actively work for the betterment of the community.
Sandy boasts an active arts scene and is home to the Sandy Actors Theatre and the W’yest Artisan Guild. Local artists display their work throughout town but notably at the Chamber, the library and the Theatre.
Major murals adorn the city walls and summer time brings additional arts, crafts, music, theater and movies into Sandy through the Mountain Festival, Oktoberfest and a series of free concerts and movies
in Meinig Park.
Sandy is proud of its outstanding public library, newly remodeled Community and Senior Center, and a fine public school system, the Oregon Trail School District.
U.S. Highway 26 remains a major thoroughfare for travelers and for commerce; agriculture is central to the area’s economic stability; and industrial activity is increasing. However, the prominent attraction to Sandy continues to be “it’s a great place to live”
Map of Sandy Oregon
History of Sandy, OregonIn 1845, Samuel K. Barlow, a pioneer emigrant from Kentucky, blazed a road (known as The Barlow Road) from The Dalles, Oregon around the south side of Mt. Hood to Eagle Creek (a settlement just east of Oregon City) thus completing the last leg of the famous Oregon Trail that began in Independence, Missouri.
Sandy’s first settlers, the Francis Revenue family, arrived in 1853 and soon opened a trading post here on the Barlow Road and served many of the thousands of pioneers who traveled through on their way to the Willamette Valley.
Sandy’s first Post Office was established in 1873 and the village became an incorporated city in 1911.
Sandy was named for the nearby Sandy River which was originally identified as the “Quicksand River” by Lewis and Clark; however, the name “Quicksand” gradually evolved into “Sandy”.
Visit the Sandy Historical Society Website.

Estacada, Oregon

Estacada, Oregon

Estacada

Estacada ( /ˌɛstəˈkeɪdə/) is a city in Clackamas County, Oregon, United States, about 30 miles southeast of Portland. The population was 2,695 at the 2010 census. [3]
History
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The Estacada post office opened in February 1904 and the city was incorporated in May 1905. The community formed as a camp for workers building a hydroelectric dam on the nearby Clackamas River that was to supply Portland with electricity. At the time, the river was relatively inaccessible by road, forcing the Oregon Power Railway Company to build a railway to the vicinity of the river to transport crews to the river for the construction of the dam. After the construction of the Hotel Estacada, the town became a weekend destination on the railroad line for residents of Portland. During the week, the train carried freight and work crews to and from Portland. Following the development of the dams, the city became a hub for the logging industry. In the early 20th century, a trolley line connected the town with downtown Portland. The railway line has been removed and there is no longer rail service to Estacada.
 NameThe origin of the city's name is disputed. One explanation is that the city's name is a corruption of the name of a local resident, Esther Katie.[citation needed] There is no evidence that she existed. The more prosaic explanation is that someone with knowledge of the Llano Estacado region of modern-day Texas threw the name in a hat and it won, but somehow the final o became an a.[citation needed]
Another theory states that:
“Estacado is a Spanish word and it means staked out or marked with stakes. It was first suggested by George Kelly as a name for the town site at a meeting of the Oregon Water Power Townsite Company directors on December 27, 1903. Kelly had selected the name at random from a U.S. Map which showed Llano Estacado, in Texas. If Kelly's suggestion had not been drawn from the hat, the town could have been named Rochester, Lowell or Lynn.

The name Estacada is also used in Arizona

Eagle Creek, Oregon

Eagle Creek, Oregon


Eagle Creek,  Oregon


Eagle Creek is an unincorporated community in Clackamas County, Oregon, United States. It is located seven miles southwest of Sandy, seven miles north of Estacada, and five miles southeast of Carver, at the junction of Oregon Routes 224 and 211, on the Clackamas River.
 Background and history: The community was named after Eagle Creek, a local stream, which in turn was named after the large population of eagles in the area. The community was called "Eagle Creek" as early as 1844, and the post office established in 1867. Philip Foster established a farm here.

Gresham, Oregon

Gresham, Oregon


W E L C O M E T O
G R E S H A M
O R E G O N




Gresham's neighborhood planning highlights the pride in local communities that is evident in Oregon's fourth largest city. Gresham's regional center is the Gresham Civic Neighborhood. The structure of this community emphasizes livability, with bike paths, landscaped sidewalks, and many different kinds of housing, all with easy access to the local area and adjacent neighborhoods. There are two MAX light rail stations in this area, providing rapid transit to all of the amenities of Portland.
Neighborhood parks in Gresham have facilities for many different activities. Red Sunset Park, located at 2403 NE Red Sunset Drive, has soccer and softball fields, a basketball court, picnic shelters, a children's play area, and a one acre duck pond. Main City Park is located next to downtown Gresham at 219 S Main Avenue. The17.5 acre park includes a children's play area, picnic tables, two little league baseball diamonds, and many bike and walking trails. Several of the trails follow Johnson Creek, which runs along the south edge of the park. There are many other parks available for recreational opportunities in the Gresham area.
Gresham is involved in developing the Springwater Trail Corridor. The 4.8 mile part of the trail that is located in Gresham is being developed into an urban wilderness pathway. This is part of a nationwide plan to convert abandoned railway lines into trails for recreation and bicycle use for the public. The city is committed to protecting natural habitats found along the corridor, while making the trail available for recreational opportunities. The Springwater Trail Corridor can be accessed at several places in Gresham, including Main City Park, and the Linemann Station and Trail Head.
The Mt. Hood Scenic Loop can be accessed from the Gresham area. The three hour round trip allows you to see some of Oregon's best scenery. Or, try some of the many different types of recreation in this area, including fishing, mountain climbing from Timberline Lodge, hiking some of the numerous trails in the Columbia Gorge, windsurfing at Hood River and much more!

Mt Hood, Oregon

Mt Hood, Oregon

The Great Wide Open – Mt. Hood
Beginning at the eastern end of Clackamas County, the Mt. Hood National Forest is a whopping one million acres. The southern region of the Mt. Hood Territory could occupy even the most spirited traveler for days. Clear alpine lakes dot the region, where the fishing is good and the living is easy. Just east of Estacada, the Clackamas River nuzzles down through the center of the Territory and the Oak Grove Fork branches off and runs into Timothy Lake at the far eastern edge of the Territory. Campgrounds, as remote as you want them to be, are nestled along the Clackamas River. This is where kayakers, canoers, and whitewater paddlers get their kicks and where the fish rise often and the nights are dreamy and silent. They ought to be - you’re miles from the clatter and din of cities or towns. Estacada welcomes the visitor to a unique hometown experience with the local heritage and culture portrayed in the public mural displays painted around town and a brewery to satisfy the thirst after strolling the unique shops and diners.
On the northern end of the Territory, take Highway 26 east from the Portland area. Explore the city of Sandy and quaint Villages of Mt. Hood like Brightwood, Welches, Zigzag and Rhododendron. Stop in at any one of the Visitor Information Centers from Zigzag to Government Camp and talk with area experts or pick up as much information about the area as you can carry. Find unique and cozy places to stay like The Resort at The Mountain, Timberline Lodge, Collins Lake Resort and many vacation rentals and B&Bs. Access the Salmon-Huckleberry Wilderness and spend a few days camping and hiking the trails that will give you staggering views. And lastly, winding your way along Highway 26 east to Government Camp – Mt. Hood’s alpine village, there’s spectacular Mt. Hood. It reaches to a height of 11,245 feet. Sledding on shallow hills, cross country skiing, snow-shoeing, downhill skiing, snowboarding and snow camping are all allowed. Timberline Lodge & Ski Area has the distinction of having the longest ski season in North America. Mt. Hood Skibowl is the nation’s largest night ski area and in the summer, transforms to become an adventure park and alpine slide.




Representing Buyers and Sellers in Oregon